Westquarter and Redding Cricket Club (WRCC) are a progressive and inclusive social enterprise who demonstrate a clear desire to make a difference within their community, using sport as a tool to create positive impact. 

Based at Bailliefields in Falkirk, they have around 200 members. Always on the front foot, they have developed and delivered a variety of successful programmes in response to identified need.In addition to their strength in identifying and addressing social issues, they also have a strong financial acumen and have created secure and diverse income streams. They operate a social enterprise model, which is financially sustainable and independent, which allows them to invest any profits into tackling social issues they wish to address within their community and not always be bound by deliverables attached to grants from funding bodies.

 

Background

WRCC were founded as a cycling and cricket club after a meeting of local residents in 1908. Cricket is their primary sport and over the years they have worked hard to grow their  membership, increase the number of teams and deliver modified versions of the game to make cricket accessible to all. They engaged with their community and formed partnerships to grow their club and help ensure its future survival. In doing so they became aware that they should make their club more attractive to members of the community and remove obstacles to participation – whether that be in cricket or other physical and social activities.

 

 WRCC Membership        BCH Timeline v2
     

 

Financing Activities

Situated between areas in the most deprived 20% as per the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD), the club serves these communities making sure that cost isn’t a barrier.
They own their facilities and in 2013 recognised the need for a children’s nursery in the area, which could leverage the farmhouse and make them self-sufficient. The old extension was demolished, and a new purpose-built extension was added to the already renovated sandstone farmhouse to create a nursery building. This is now leased by Glenbervie Kindergarden and has provided a secure income stream as well as employing 14 people from the local community and bringing an additional weekly footfall of 600 people to the site.

 

Becoming A Community Interest Company

In 2017 they began to consider their legal structure, primarily to reduce the liability of the membership and to ensure the assets of WRCC were protected. Having a secure income and funds being generated, they incorporated as a community interest company (CIC) in 2018. This introduced an asset lock over the facility - any surplus profits must be reinvested into the club for the benefit of the community and should the assets be sold, profits would have to be reinvested with another like-minded organisation. While thinking about their legal structure, they also reflected on some of their most recent work delivering a range of activities to community groups. Directors noted their aspirations to increase the work they were doing to reduce inequalities and create a positive social impact, ultimately achieving charitable status in future. They realised that they were operating a social enterprise model and began to recognise themselves as a social enterprise, subscribing to The Voluntary Code for Social Enterprise in Scotland. They became a member of SENScot and the Sport SEN and continued developing their work in the community, charitable purpose and enterprising activities. Operating as a social enterprise enables them to be financially independent and choose how they invest any profits for the benefit of their community. They also feel that it helps to create goodwill locally as it’s clear that they are delivering more than just sport, and this has increased interest from volunteers and sponsors.

 

Developing Community Programmes Using Sport & Physical Activity

They have formed several partnerships and work closely with theThey have formed several partnerships and work closely with thefollowing:

  • Children and young people:
    • Local community schools – delivering cricket sessions; CricHIIT(designed for girls using high intensity interval training and cricket drills); Enhanced Provision All Stars for children with learning and physical disabilities (now being rolled out acrossScotland by Cricket Scotland).
    • Thriving Junior Section (Westies 7 – 10) and Wolves (11+)
  • People with Mental Health conditions
    • FDAMH delivered Mental Health First Aid training and SAMH have delivered anevent focusing on mental health
  • Ethnic minority groups.
    • Including supporting Al Masaar’s EID in the Park
  • 1st Steps
    • Deliver courses which teach people recoveringfrom alcohol and drug addition how to repair bikes. They will runtheir Dr Bike clinic at the club where local residents can bringtheir bikes to the club and either have them repaired or by taught how to repair them themselves, free of charge.
  • People with Dementia:
    • Alzheimer’s Scotland – provide a variety of sessions to people with dementia including cricket, archery, petanque, tai chi, Italian, yoga and ball room dancing amongst others
  • People with Disabilities:
    • Disability organisations – delivering table cricket; modified cricket; coach development including forpeople with autism. They have now become 1 of only 3 Disability Cricket Champion Clubs in Scotland

 

Next Steps on the Journey

Achieving Charitable Status

Having worked hard over the years to develop as a cricket club,ensure their financial sustainability and then expand their offering across their community, WRCC achieved charitable status in February 2021 and is now a recognised SCIO - although will continue to recognise themselves as a social enterprise.

The main reasons for becoming a SCIO:

  • Corporation Tax Exemptions
  • Access to more funders
  • Diverse community work now meets the charity test

In doing so, they have changed their name to Bailliefields Community Hub SCIO which they feel reflects their wider community and socialpurpose.

 

Facility Redevelopment

They have been developing a new facility project to turn their currentchanging facilities into a community hub.The redevelopment is split into two phases. Phase 1 creates the new accessible modular changing rooms with associated groundworks which frees up the existing building for Phase 2 to create the new social space. Phase 1 is fully funded with £100k awarded by sportscotland, £70k from Landfill and £39k committed by the club.

Phase 2 will follow - planning permission has been applied for andPhase 2 will follow - planning permission has been applied for and work is underway to secure funding for the £250k required to give the hub a social home. Landfill and the hub will again be contributing towards this phase with further funding being sought from the Robertson Trust, Postcode Lottery, National Lottery, Falkirk Counciland Schools Charity Board.

The new Hub will offermore space to deliver their programmes and they are committed to expanding their reach and tackling inequalitieswithin their local area,remaining a financially sustainable social enterprise.